Discovered: The ancient boundaries of Toxteth Park. We also rechart the boundaries of Liverpool and Everton, before 1207.

In this post we rediscover the earliest boundaries of Toxteth Park using documents from the 11th to 14th centuries. We show that half of Liverpool city centre was originally in Toxteth. We also show the origin of Everton, its name and its original boundary. This is without doubt our most complex post so far, butContinue reading “Discovered: The ancient boundaries of Toxteth Park. We also rechart the boundaries of Liverpool and Everton, before 1207.”

Depictions of enslaved African children on Martins Bank, and chained figures on the Nelson Monument

The Martins Bank building on Water Street (1932) and the Nelson Monument on Exchange Flags (1813) are two of Liverpool’s architectural treasures. Both have been said to depict, or allude to, enslaved Africans. Reliefs on the entrance to the bank is said to include two enslaved African children with wrist and ankle restraints. The twoContinue reading “Depictions of enslaved African children on Martins Bank, and chained figures on the Nelson Monument”

The Guinea Gap, buried treasure in Wallasey

Local legend tells of a hoard of up to fifty gold guineas, discovered on Wallasey’s shore circa 1850. The coins were said to be from the late 17th century and featured the heads of King William and Queen Mary. Next to the treasure was a skeleton with a pigtail. To commemorate this event, the locationContinue reading “The Guinea Gap, buried treasure in Wallasey”

Goree, Liverpool. Part Two: The Goree Piazza

This is the concluding part of our history of an area in Liverpool named after the 18th century slave-trading post of Gorée in Senegal. This deals with a famous range of warehouses known as Goree Piazza that were destroyed by fire in 1802, and rebuilt soon after. Also, as generations of Liverpudlians were once convincedContinue reading “Goree, Liverpool. Part Two: The Goree Piazza”

The Black Boy and Mortar – Opposite Liverpool’s Town Hall

Our previous post dealt with two discoveries of forgotten place-names and shop signs that further linked Liverpool to the slave trade. Here is another we have recently discovered, this time a chemist shop in 1760 called the Black Boy and Mortar. This was located in High Street, opposite the town hall. The Black Boy andContinue reading “The Black Boy and Mortar – Opposite Liverpool’s Town Hall”

The Black Moor’s Head and the Bight of Benin in Liverpool – New slave trade era discoveries by the Old Dock

It is well known that Liverpool’s links to the the transatlantic slave trade survive in street names. But what of the streets that no longer exist? What could their names tell us of the darkest chapter of Liverpool’s history? Most streets in Liverpool that are linked to the slave trade owe their names to theContinue reading “The Black Moor’s Head and the Bight of Benin in Liverpool – New slave trade era discoveries by the Old Dock”

Kirklands, Hardman Street – a lost Peter Ellis building, hiding in plain sight

Thought to date from 1888, our new research shows the building is actually from 1860. Assumed to be demolished, it’s actually another surviving building by the the acclaimed Liverpool architect Peter Ellis. For the benefit of anyone not from Liverpool, or too young to remember, Kirklands was a famous cafe, bar and nightclub that ranContinue reading “Kirklands, Hardman Street – a lost Peter Ellis building, hiding in plain sight”

Finding Woodcroft Park, Liverpool’s lost football ground

Bygone liverpool join the quest to discover the location of the lost football ground of Liverpool Caledonian AFC from 1891 to 1892. After a search by historians that began in 2014, we think we can finally solve the mystery. Back in 2014, a search began to find the location of a football stadium in WavertreeContinue reading “Finding Woodcroft Park, Liverpool’s lost football ground”

Stonewall Jackson, a once-enslaved African lived in Seaforth until 1926

Our recent research into a cook being flogged at sea for under-cooking Scouse took on a fascinating twist when we researched the owners of the ship Stuart & Douglas. The owners of the ship Sea were Peter Stuart and Peter Douglas. Stuart lived at Elm House, Crosby Road South, Seaforth. From the early 1870s PeterContinue reading “Stonewall Jackson, a once-enslaved African lived in Seaforth until 1926”

Flogged 36 times for messing up the Scouse

Scousers are as proud of the dish that gave them their name as they are of the city itself. The ingredients often cause a debate, as does what you put on top of it. You could say we are passionate about it, but certainly not as much as this sea captain below. In 1856 heContinue reading “Flogged 36 times for messing up the Scouse”

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